Search

nhliblog

NHLI community news for staff and students

Month

October 2016

Carry on Ceilidh

By Emily Timcke


004Students and staff danced the night away at the NHLI’s welcome and farewell event for post-graduate taught programmes.

The dinner and dance event took place last week at the Queens Tower Rooms on the South Kensington Campus. The aim of the event was to allow our graduating students the opportunity to meet and share their experiences with the new students. So those who have already studied one of our post-graduate taught programmes can pass on first-hand their ideas of what to expect during their studies. Staff from the education, administrative and teaching teams were also on hand to answer any student questions and join in the dancing, including course leaders and Director of Education at NHLI Sue Smith.

Attendees were brought together by local folk band ‘Muscadin’ who succeeded in spreading their love of folk dancing, even with those of us who may not have done much, if any, folk dancing before. The dances of the night involved moving around the room and mingling with people who you may not have met beforehand, therefore encouraging the interaction between students and staff from different courses.

Ellie Wilde, Trainee Education Administrator with NHLI, attended the evening and remarked “This was my first Cèilidh experience and I had great fun.  The live band, Muscadin, were excellent – everyone likes a bit of folk music and dancing.  I enjoyed swinging all the NHLI students and staff around on the dance floor.  It was certainly a very lively evening, filled with lots of food, wine, skipping, hand-clapping and brow sweating. Luckily, kilts or tartan were not required!”.

A great night was had by all, a fitting hello and goodbye for NHLI students.

048.JPG

Advertisements

Communication and negotiation for female leaders

Originally posted on the Biochemical Society blog

By Dr Charlotte Dodson


Prepare, prepare, prepare. These were the three most important take-home messages from the EMBO course on communication and negotiation for female leaders at the end of September 2016.

charlotte-planning-to-negotiate-her-holiday_highresEverything was defined in a scientific business context (no communication to lay audiences here) and after two and a half days of active listening, transactional analysis, thinking about relative needs and head-down building roadmaps for hard negotiations we wanted more!

Step one: ignore the other party and decide what you want. Oh so easy to say, but so hard to do. In detail. More detail. The more detail I write down, the more flexible I can be in my negotiation (apparently).

Step two: place an ambition on everything – in the ideal world how much lab space do I want, what equipment do I need access to, what would I like to be paid…

Step three: what are my limits? For what things is there a point at which I will stop and walk away? What is that point? Would I really walk away for one unit lower?

Step four: what other criteria don’t have limits but are ‘important’? What information would it be in my interest for the other person to know about me? (Make a list, make sure you tell them!) What questions do I have? (Questions must be facts, and can’t be negotiation points – don’t put the same thing in two places…).

Only once I know all of this can I even talk to the other side (or so I learned).

dodson2We negotiated to buy a house, a holiday, to start up a lab, to get a job. We watched each other, we gave feedback (‘I really liked… and next time I would change…’), we got stopped mid-sentence from giving abstract advice such as ‘…couldn’t she have…?’ and instead were invited to change places and have a try ourselves. It’s a bit harder when you’re sitting in the hot seat (I learned). Am I trying to negotiate? Or convince? Offer an alternative, buy, compromise or impose?

Aside from the roadmaps, the one exercise that will really stick in my mind is the one on body language:

  • ‘Find a partner where each person speaks a language that the other doesn’t understand,’ we were told.
  • Next, ‘relate a story to the other person about something which has an emotion involved, eg happy, sad, angry.’
  • And finally, ‘Ask the other person what emotion they thought the story was about’.

Vraiment, GCSE French m’a equipé pour communiquer avec mes collègues, and astoundingly the emotion of the story was communicated absolutely perfectly, even through the struggle for scraps of vocabulary. Perhaps more interestingly, conveying emotions wasn’t just limited to communication within European languages.

My only regret is that my colleagues know what I’ve been doing. ‘What,’ I hear them thinking, ‘is she going to ask for next?’ Good question, but we also learned that there isn’t always a negotiated solution. What we can do though is try: ‘it may take two to tango, but it only needs one to lead the dance’.

Charlotte Dodson is a Research Fellow at Imperial College London. Her attendance at the course was funded by a Biochemical Society Travel Grantand her Imperial College Research Fellowship. She is assured that there are plans to run the course for all sexes in 2017.

 

Photo credits: Hilde Janssens

‘Fortune Sides with Her Who Dares’: Highly acclaimed cardiologist Barbara Casadei to deliver the NHLI Athena SWAN Lecture in January

British Heart Foundation awards £900,000 to top Oxford Professor Barbara Casadei. Picture by Danny Fitzpatrick / dfphotography Copyright

Professor Barbara Casadei hopes to inspire the next generation of female scientists by encouraging women in the progression of their scientific careers.  As such, she is the perfect speaker for the next NHLI Athena Lecture. The NHLI Athena SWAN lecture series highlights high profile female scientists and asks them to talk about their research and career path as a woman.

Prof Barbara Casadei: Fortune Sides with Her Who Dares

Tuesday 31st of Jan 2017, 4 pm

Room G34, Sir Alexander Fleming (SAF) Building, South Kensington campus

The talk will look at Barbara’s research and how her career has expanded, leading to her current posts as a Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Oxford, Deputy Head of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Fellow of Wolfson College.

After studying medicine in Italy, Barbara Casadei moved to Oxford to undertake her clinical and research training. She was awarded the Joan and Richard Doll Fellowship at Green College in 1991, a DPhil in Cardiovascular Medicine in 1995, and a BHF Senior Research Fellowship in 2001.

To register for this popular event, please email Ms Emily Timcke at e.timcke@imperial.ac.uk to ensure your place.

After the lecture, all attendees are invited to join us for drinks and nibbles from 5 pm onwards.

More about Barbara Casadei can be found here.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑