image001We hear from a member of the NHLI Postdoc Committee and a PhD student on their experiences of the NHLI Postdoc Day that was held on January 23rd 2017. The event is designed to give our postdocs an opportunity to explore their career options and focus on their career progression as well as to network with other NHLI postdocs.

NHLI Postdoc Day 2017 from the perspective of the Postdoc Committee

Life as a postdoctoral researcher isn’t always straightforward. Although you’ve completed the seemingly unending task of your PhD, which is a large weight off your shoulders, by taking the next logical step and becoming a postdoctoral researcher, your future can feel uncertain. With only 1/10 postdoctoral researchers successful in pursuing a career in academia, making the best of every opportunity is key.  This was clearly highlighted at the NHLI Postdoc Day on 23rd January.

Hearing from successful postdocs in how they have managed to drive their career forward, despite setbacks was both heartening and inspirational, and their ‘hints and tips’ were extremely useful!

The day began with a talk from the PostDoc Development Centre representative Karen Hinxman.  Karen highlighted what the PDC could do to help the postdocs at Imperial.  From CV checking to running courses and giving mock interviews for prospective job and fellowship applications, the PDC is an invaluable resource. We then heard from three researchers, Dr Louise Blakemore, Dr James Harker and Dr Jon Wilkinson highlighting the different pathways that a postdoctoral researcher wishing to take the academic route can take. Hearing from successful postdocs in how they have managed to drive their career forward, despite setbacks was both heartening and inspirational, and their ‘hints and tips’ were extremely useful! We then heard some enlightening talks about how Athena SWAN initiatives can help our career development and also the importance of open access publishing. Lunch provided the opportunity to network with fellow postdocs and also to meet the postdoc reps and speakers – and ask them any questions.

After lunch we heard from Sarah Lloyd from the Wellcome Trust who gave us an overview of the funding offered to postdocs, both early career and those looking to establish their own research groups, and also gave us some key tips to help with applications. Dr Charlotte Dean, a PI from Imperial, then outlined her career path and how it fit in with family life. The day ended with three former NHLI postdocs and alternative career paths they have taken, in industry, academic publishing and public outreach which was both eye opening and informative, and let us know that life on the bench isn’t the only option post-PhD.

As an early career postdoctoral researcher, I found this whole day invaluable, and the event has helped me to gain some much-needed direction in driving my career forward!

By Sara Bonvini

NHLI Postdoc Day 2017 from the Perspective of a Final Year PhD student

Being a final year PhD student brings lots of questions and uncertainties. Apart from the PhD project itself, the most burning question is – “What next?”. According to The Royal Society (2010), only about 3.5% of PhD students stay in academia/University research, so what happens to the rest of them and what will happen to me?

The rest of the presentations were interesting and inspirational stories of journeys of some of the ex-NHLI postdocs.

The NHLI Postdoc Day, to which they invite PhD students in their final year, can help to answer some of these questions. The day is filled with lectures and this year we had eleven speakers. About half of the presentations were about the support for postdocs that is available at the Imperial College London and NHLI – the Postdoc Development Centre, the Open Access Publishing, the Wellcome Trust Funding, and the Athena SWAN programme. To me as a PhD student, it was useful to learn what it would be like to take a postdoc position at the College or specifically with NHLI.

The rest of the presentations were interesting and inspirational stories of journeys of some of the ex-NHLI postdocs. It was reassuring to hear that the road after PhD is not always a straight one. It can take turns and bumps due to personal or family priorities at a time, but rather that being a hindrance, it can actually enrich and expand our scientific world; being it teaching science to children abroad, or working as a scientist in an industry developing a diagnostic assay for clinical use.

I enjoyed all the presentations, and I learnt a lot. I believe that it would be beneficial to all PhD students, regardless of how far in their PhD they are. It might inspire them and help them to understand the different challenges and possibilities inside and outside of academia after they finish their PhD.

By Tatiana Svermova

img_2804_crop
Members of the NHLI Postdoc Committee with Prof Miriam Moffatt
Advertisements